C-119 Fairchild Flying Boxcar Gamble Chalk 1

Fairchild C-119B of the 314th Troop Carrier Group in flight, 1952 (021001-O-9999G-016).jpg

Status:
Date: Friday 7 November 1952
Time: ca 02:30
Type: Silhouette image of generic C119 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Fairchild C-119C-22-FA Flying Boxcar
Operator: United States Air Force – USAF
Registration: 51-2560
C/n / msn: 10518
First flight:
Engines: Pratt & Whitney R-4360-20WA
Crew: Fatalities: 5 / Occupants: 5
Passengers: Fatalities: 14 / Occupants: 14
Total: Fatalities: 19 / Occupants: 19
Aircraft damage: Damaged beyond repair
Location: Mt. McKinley, AK (   United States of America)
Phase: En route (ENR)
Nature: Military

 https://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19521107-0

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Family’s closure rests on remote Alaskan glacier

 

 

 

Frank Blasi still remembers the last time he saw his brother, Daniel Blasi.

Frank was at a neighbor’s farm in St. Leo, working during the harvest. Daniel had just been drafted into the Korean War and came over to tell his younger brother.

“He cried before he left that day and we all felt he had a feeling he would never come home,” Frank said. “It still bothers me that I saw him crying because I had never seen him cry.”

Growing up on a 160-acre farm in Kingman County, and with 17 brothers and sisters, there was too much to do and little time for tears.

But Daniel’s premonition was right. On Nov. 7, 1952, the 22-year-old died in an Alaskan plane crash aboard a C-119. For years, the family only knew a few details. Mainly, that 19 servicemen, including Daniel, died when the plane collided with the side of Mount Silverthrone around 2:50 a.m.

In August, Frank and Jeanette Blasi found out for sure that is the site of where Daniel died. It took over 15 years of work from their son, Father Leo Blasi, and the help of a total stranger before a piece of evidence was found that was so compelling the U.S. Air Force agreed it was the site of Gamble Chalk 1.

 

To read more: https://www.hutchnews.com/news/20171111/familys-closure-rests-on-remote-alaskan-glacier

 

 

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Mr. Terry Mates post about his father that went missing aboard the missing C-119.

                                                                                           

 

My father flew to Korea in a C119. He was flying in a war zone in Korea for 10 months, I believe. He survived the war and came home. A few months later he was flying a C19 in Alaska as a co-pilot (aka Gamble Chalk 1). Long story short they crashed into Mount Silverthrone, peak 5, November 7th, 1952. All 19 veterans were killed. They found wreckage on November 10th, 1952. It was known where the crash was and where the 19 veterans were located. From that point on things really went downhill. The plane eventually slipped down the mountain and today (2019) the debris is some 5 1/2 miles out on a glacier, along with the remains of all 19 killed. In the last 5 years, numerous people have tried to call attention to this, everyone cares but nothing gets done. Two things I want to point out; One of the excuses I have been told is in the 1950’s they did not have the proper helicopters to fly out, but there was studebaker weasel (world war II snowmobile) that could have provided access. Next, the other excuse is that the weather is so bad in Delani National Park, they only have a three-week window per year to go to the crash site. If the weather is so bad there, they should close the park. I do not understand how visitors can go there all summer but the wreckage can only be reached three weeks out of the year. Please understand, I live in Colorado, that is known for mountains and snow. I have been working in the mountains for years, a colorado resident of 40 years. If interested go to Gamble Chalk 1 (https://www.facebook.com/groups/398743990227955/) and you may be interested in Rolling Box Car (https://www.facebook.com/rollingboxcar/), read the mission. I also put a post on US/West Retirees and Wannabees (https://www.facebook.com/groups/255603593469/search/?query=terry%20mates&epa=SEARCH_BOX) . That one will maybe save your life. In closing, if everyone cared like they say they do, how do you leave the remains of 19 veterans in an ice glacier in a national park for all these years.

 

 

 

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How a retired geologist discovered a long lost Air Force crash in the Alaska Range

 

 

Eldridge Glacier in the Alaska Range, where the debris field from Gamble Chalk 1, a U.S. Air Force C-119 aircraft that crashed into Mt. Silverthrone on Nov. 7,1952, was discovered on Aug. 17, 2016. (Photo by Frances Caulfield)

Eldridge Glacier in the Alaska Range, where the debris field from Gamble Chalk 1, a U.S. Air Force C-119 aircraft that crashed into Mt. Silverthrone on Nov. 7,1952, was discovered on Aug. 17, 2016. (Photo by Frances Caulfield)

For more than 60 years, remnants of a wrecked U.S. Air Force plane were lost in the Alaska Range, buried beneath ice and snow on a glacier snaking through a mountainside. And for generations, families had no hope of recovering the bodies of 19 service members killed in the 1952 crash.

Until now.

The plane — a boxy C-119 aircraft known by its radio call sign, Gamble Chalk 1 — has been found. Retired geologist Michael Rocereta, who spent much of his career searching for, and discovering, oil fields, used his training in glaciology to sleuth out the plane’s movement through the decades as a glacier slowly carried it away from the crash site.

What will happen next is unclear. A helicopter flight to the wreckage is planned for August, to assess whether recovery of human remains is possible. Families of men killed in the flight, like 23-year-old Daniel Blasi of Kansas, hope for closure. “We’re praying that something happens pretty quick,” said Daniel’s nephew, Leo Blasi, of any possible recovery missions.

PFC Daniel Blasi died in the Gamble Chalk 1 airplane crash of 1952. (Photo courtesy Blasi family)

PFC Daniel Blasi died in the Gamble Chalk 1 airplane crash of 1952. (Photo courtesy Blasi family)

 

 

Already the Blasi family has visited the site, along with National Park Service officials who confirmed the location of the plane by retrieving a piece of debris imprinted with the Gamble Chalk 1 serial number.

If it wasn’t for years of volunteer effort and a lucky break, the discovery might have never happened.

‘How could I miss it?’

Gamble Chalk 1 was the first of three U.S. Air Force planes to crash in Alaska in as many weeks in November 1952. The second, Warm Wind 3, is still lost in the Cook Inlet area. The third, a Globemaster, was found on Colony Glacier in 2012. Military officials have been recovering human remains and debris since, sending recovered service members home with full military honors.

Retired geologist and geophysicist Michael Rocereta at Birchwood Airport on Tuesday, Aug. 22, 2017. (Bill Roth / ADN)

Retired geologist and geophysicist Michael Rocereta at Birchwood Airport on Tuesday, Aug. 22, 2017. (Bill Roth / ADN)

Debris from Gamble Chalk 1, a U.S. Air Force C-119 aircraft that crashed into Mount Silverthrone on Nov. 7, 1952. Photographed Aug. 17, 2016. (Photo by Frances Caulfield)

Debris from Gamble Chalk 1, a U.S. Air Force C-119 aircraft that crashed into Mount Silverthrone on Nov. 7, 1952. Photographed Aug. 17, 2016. (Photo by Frances Caulfield)

To read more: https://www.adn.com/alaska-news/military/2018/07/28/how-a-retired-geologist-discovered-a-long-lost-air-force-plane-crash-in-the-alaska-range/

 

 

 

 

Northrop F-89C Scorpion missing Nov 23, 1953

KINROSS AFB MISSING F-89C – 23 NOV 1953
USAF REPORT OF AIRCRAFT ACCIDENT

July 03, 1999

The 23 November 1953 “Kinross Case,” wherein a US Air Force F-89C jet fighter was scrambled from Kinross AFB Michigan on an “active air defense mission” to intercept an “unknown aircraft” and disappeared with two crew members aboard, is considered by many to be one of the “UFO classics.” Controversy remains over what the “unknown aircraft,” which was the target of the interception, was. USAF records presented here indicate that it was a Canadian aircraft. Canadian officials have denied that any of their aircraft was the target of an interception mission by the USAF on the date in question. The USAF seems to have changed its story over the years about just what Canadian aircraft was being intercepted and has been silent on the method by which they identified the aircraft. (See the UFO Evidence (Ref. Below) for an official Canadian statement)

It is the occurrence of the radar trace of the “unknown aircraft” and the F-89 appearing to “merge” on the Ground Control radar screen shortly after (voice) radio and IFF contact with the F-89 were lost that has made this case loom large in UFO circles. Some print references have the remaining single “blip” moving rapidly off the radar screens, but the USAF records presented here indicate that the “unknown aircraft” continued on its original course.

The weather, although stable as far as flight is concerned, was winter. Even if the crew survived a hypothetical crash, their chances for survival would be considerably diminished by the freezing temperatures, especially if they went into the water. Snow on the ground certainly hampered the search activities.

Whatever the case, no trace of the F-89 or either of the crewmembers were ever located even though an extensive search was mounted in the days immediately after the F-89 went missing.

read more: http://www.cufon.org/kinross/kinross_missing.htm

 

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Another Unsolved Mystery: The Kinross Incident

 

The Kinross Incident is a famous aviation accident which many still believe shows proof of an extraterrestrial encounter. The story unfolds in late November in 1953 over the Great Lakes.

The Air Defense Command was activated in 1946 to offer air warning and air defence for the continental United States. The plan was to extend seaward the wall of powerful land-based radar with airborne early warning and control units. Within a short time the Air Defense Command grew from four fighter squadrons to 93 active Air Force fighter interceptor squadrons, 76 Air National Guard fighter interceptor squadrons, several Naval fighter squadrons, USAF and USN airborne early warning squadrons, radar squadrons, training squadrons and numerous support units.

First Lieutenant Felix Moncla Jr was a US Air Force pilot on temporary assignment at Kinross Air Force Base. He had over 1,000 hours of flight time. His last flight was an air defence intercept which was coordinated by the Air Defense Command.

On the 23rd of November 1953, radio operators at Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan saw something unexpected at St Mary’s River. St Mary’s River flows between Lake Superior and Lake Huron, marking the border between Michigan, US and Ontario, Canada. Radar operators identified an unusual target in restricted airspace over the Soo Locks, the set of parallel locks on St. Mary’s River which allows ships to travel between Lake Superior and the lower Great Lakes.

An F-89C Scorpion jet was scrambled from Kinross Air Force Base to investigate.

The Northrop F-89 Scorpion was an American jet-powered fighter designed for use as an all weather interceptor. The name “Scorpion” comes from the shape of the raised tail. The Scorpion has two engines, six guns (controlled by radar) and two crew: the pilot and the radar operator. The F-89A was a prototype: only eight models were ever made. F-89B entered service in June 1951; however these had considerable problems with engines and other systems and were replaced with F-89C. The problems with the engines persisted and the F-89 was grounded when structural problems with the wings were discovered. The F-89D entered service in 1954, a year after the events of the Kinross Incident.

U.S. Air Force Northrop F-89D-45-NO Scorpion interceptors of the 59th Fighter Interceptor Squadrons, Goose Bay AB, Labrador (Canada), in the 1950s. 52-1959 in foreground, now in storage at Edwards AFB, California. USAF Museum

 

Read more: https://fearoflanding.com/history/another-unsolved-mystery-the-kinross-incident/

 

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Over Lake Superior
Disappearance of Lt. Felix E. Moncla

The year 2003 marks the 50th anniversary of the disappearance of USAF 1st Lt. Felix E. Moncla, Jr., who, together with his fellow crew member, 2nd Lt. Robert L. Wilson, disappeared over Lake Superior on November 23, 1953, while pursuing in their F-89C “Scorpion” a UFO which was seen on radar. Radar data at the time of the incident suggested to witnesses involved in the pursuit that the object being pursued by Lts. Moncla and Wilson had suddenly reversed its course, approached the aircraft, and “merged” with it.

 

Read more: http://www.nuforc.org/mancla.html

 

 

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1953: The Kinross Air Force Base Incident

Summary/Description: On the evening of 23 November 1953, an Air Force radar controller became alerted to an “unidentified target” over Lake Superior, and an F-89C Scorpion jet was scrambled from Kinross AFB. Radar controllers watched as the F-89 closed in on the UFO, and then sat stunned in amazement as the two blips merged on the screen, and the UFO left. The F-89 and it’s two man crew, pilot Felix Moncla and radar operator Robert Wilson, were never found, even after a thorough search of the area.

 

 

Press article, regarding the incident, in the Wisconsin State Journal (Madison, WI), Nov. 25, 1953.

Above image (top of page): 1st Lieutenant  Felix E. “Gene” Moncla, Jr., the pilot of the F89C Scorpion jet. Moncla was accompanied by Radar Operator 2nd Lieutenant  Robert Wilson in the rear seat.

“The Disappearance of Lt. Felix Moncla”

Read more: http://www.thinkaboutitdocs.com/1953-the-kinross-air-force-base-incident/

 

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Kinross AFB / F-89 Disappearance
November 23, 1953
Lt. Felix Moncla near his F-89

Richard Hall:
On the night of November 23, 1953, an Air Defense Command radar detected an unidentified “target” over Lake Superior.   Kinross Air Force Base, closest to the scene, alerted the 433rd Fighter Interceptor Squadron at Truax Field, Madison, Wisconsin, and an F-89C all-weather interceptor was scrambled.  Radar operators watched the “blips” of the UFO and the F-89 merge on their scopes, in an apparent collision, and disappear.  No trace of the plane was ever found.

US Air Force accident-report records indicate that the F-89 was vectored west northwest, then west, climbing to 30,000 feet.  At the controls were First Lieutenant Felix E. Moncla, Jr.; his radar observer was Second Lieutenant Robert L. Wilson.  While on a westerly course, they were cleared to descend to 7,000 feet, turning east-northeast and coming steeply down on the known target from above.  The last radar contact placed the interceptor at 8,000 feet, 70 miles off Keeweenaw Point, and about 150 miles northwest of Kinross AFB (now Kincheloe AFB).

The incident is not even labeled as a “UFO” case in Air Force records; instead, it was investigated by air-safety experts.  There were several layers of scattered clouds (one with bottoms at 5,000 to 8,000 feet) and some snow flurries in the general area.  Official records state, however, that the air was stable and there was little or no turbulence.

The Air Force later stated that the “UFO” turned out to be a Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) C-47 “On a night flight from Winnipeg, Manitoba, to Sudbury, Ontario Canada.”  The F-89 apparently had crashed for unknown reasons after breaking off the intercept.  In answer to queries from the NATIONAL INVESTIGATIONS COMMITTEE ON AERIAL PHENOMENA (NICAP) in 1961 and again in 1963, RCAF spokesmen denied that one of their planes was involved.  Squadron Leader W. B. Totman, noting that the C-47 was said to be on a flight plan over Canadian territory, said “… this alone would seem to make such an intercept unlikely.”

 

Read more: http://www.nicap.org/reports/kinross.htm

 

Douglas C-124C Globemaster II missing January 1, 1964

Status:
Date: Thursday 2 January 1964
Type: Douglas C-124C Globemaster II
Operator: United States Air Force – USAF
Registration: 52-0968
C/n / msn: 43877
First flight:
Engines: Pratt & Whitney R-4360-20WA
Crew: Fatalities: 8 / Occupants: 8
Passengers: Fatalities: 1 / Occupants: 1
Total: Fatalities: 9 / Occupants: 9
Aircraft damage: Missing
Aircraft fate: Presumed damaged beyond repair
Location: 1200 km (750 mls) W off Hawaii (   Pacific Ocean)
Phase: En route (ENR)
Nature: Military
Departure airport: Wake Island Airport (AWK/PAWK), U.S. Minor Outlying Islands
Destination airport: Honolulu-Hickam AFB, HI (HIK), United States of America

Narrative:
Missing at over the Pacific Ocean while on a flight from Wake Island to Hawaii.

Sources:

» The Sydney Morning Herald. – Jan 4, 1964

source: https://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19640102-0

Douglas C-54D-10-DC missing July 29, 1950 Juneau, Alaska

Status:
Date: Saturday 29 July 1950
Type: Silhouette image of generic DC4 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Douglas C-54D-10-DC (DC-4)
Operator: United States Air Force – USAF
Registration: 42-72700
C/n / msn: 10805
First flight: 1945
Crew: Fatalities: 5 / Occupants: 5
Passengers: Fatalities: 1 / Occupants: 1
Total: Fatalities: 6 / Occupants: 6
Aircraft damage: Damaged beyond repair
Location: 156 km (97.5 mls) W of Juneau, AK (   United States of America)
Phase: En route (ENR)
Nature: Military
Departure airport: Tacoma-McChord AFB, WA (TCM/KTCM), United States of America
Destination airport: Anchorage-Elmendorf AFB, AK (EDF/PAED), United States of America

Narrative:
The C-54 transport plane was operating on a routine cargo flight when it impacted 1000 feet below the summit of 10,740-foot Mount La Perouse.

Classification:

Controlled Flight Into Terrain (CFIT) – Mountain

Sources:

» Star-News – Aug 7, 1950
» Aviation Archaeological Investigation and Research (AAIR)

source:  http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19500729-1

 

 

 

Airman Abandon Alaskan Rescue

Six Fliers Aboard Big Transport In Crash Believed Killed

ANCHORAGE, Alaska, Aug 6 Efforts to reach the wreckage of a C-54 transport high on a southeastern Alaska peak were abandoned today. The six men aboard the crashed plane were listed by the Air Force as presumed dead.

To read more: https://news.google.com/newspapers?id=XGpgAAAAIBAJ&sjid=6XENAAAAIBAJ&pg=1487%2C1668990

 

Crash of a Douglas C-54D-10-DC Skymaster on the Mt La Pérouse: 6 killed

Date & Time: Jul 29, 1950

Type of aircraft:Douglas C-54 Skymaster (29601)”>

Registration:

42-72700

Flight Phase:

Flight Type:

Survivors:

No

Site:

Schedule:

McChord – Elmendorf

MSN:

10805

YOM:

1945

Location: Mt La Pérouse (23453)”>

Alaska (13556)”>

Region:

Crew on board:

5
Crew fatalities:

Pax on board:

1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:

Total fatalities:

6

Circumstances:

While in cruising altitude about 98 miles northwest of Juneau, the four-engine aircraft hit the slope of Mt La Pérouse (10,740 feet high). The wreckage was found about 1,000 feet below the summit and all six occupants were killed.

Causes:

Controlled flight into terrain.

Missing Airmen 

P. Eugent T. Sewall:                   Airman # 13009A
CP William E. Reese:                 Airman # AO-590105
S/Sgt Francis V Toomey:          Airman # AF-321385527
CE Robert E Weber:                   Airman # AF-16280272
S/Sgt Elain J Vanhills                Airman #  AF-16260523
1st Lt R.C. Reish                          Airman # 14800A
P. Eugent T. Sewall: Basic at Greenville, MS. He graduated at Blytheville AAFd with the Class of 43B, S/N: O-797617. He was a B-17 pilot with the 92nd Bomb Group 407th Bomb Sqdn flying missions out of England.
CPTFrom ME
Eugene T. Sewall

U.S. Navy C-47, BUNO 17254, in Chile on August 4, 1969

~ALWAYS REMEMBER~ The Lost Sixteen, Blessings To All This Memorial Day!~

Posted by C-47 BuNo 17254 Missing Aircraft and Sixteen Andes Mountains 1969 on Friday, May 23, 2014

 

 

Missing Aircraft Appeal is posted in an effort to focus renewed attention on important unresolved cases involving United States Military aircraft that have disappeared in the last century.

According to the investigative report, the U.S. Navy aircraft was on a
scheduled maintenance flight to Buenos Aires, Argentina and on board were 16
passengers comprised of U.S. Navy and U.S. Air Force service members along
with several spouses.

Radio contact with the U.S. Navy aircraft was lost after the aircraft was
approximately 27 miles south of the capital city of Santiago—-some 20
minutes after departure—- somewhere between Rancagua, Chile and Angostura,
Chile according to the report findings.

The flight path appears initially to have been one that flew along the
Chilean side of the Andes mountain range until it was to reach a more
southern point at Curico, Chile and then take a flight path East through an
approved mountain pass through the Andes mountains towards Buenos Aires.

The lost radio contact happened at least 15 minutes before the aircraft was
even scheduled to reach the southern beacon point at Curico, Chile to access
the southern mountain pass.

The August timeframe is during the winter season in Chile and Argentina
—essentially the reverse of our seasons here in the U.S.— and the
weather conditions were apparently very poor. Although a somewhat intensive
search was conducted at the time by Chilean military and civilian personnel
along with some American military aircraft support, severe weather was a
factor and the search ended on August 14, 1969. References were made to
continuing the search later during their warmer season but I have not been
able to confirm that this ever really took place.

This unresolved and mysterious tragedy was overshadowed and subsequently
forgotten due in part to the extreme weather conditions at the time and
quite possibly because on July 24, 1969 the Apollo 11 Astronauts had just
returned from the first successful moon landing.

Read more: http://www.aircraftwrecks.com/appeal.htm

 

 

Disappearance of a U.S. Navy C-47, BUNR 17254, in Chile on August 4, 1969

The purpose of this post, albeit out of the ordinary, is to
generate interest in and request a renewed search effort concerning a missing U.S. Navy
C-47 Aircraft, BUNR 17254, which is presumed to have crashed and was lost on
August 4, 1969 in Chile, South America. It has Never been located.

The loss of this aircraft is an unsolved mystery even to this day. This
incident hardly received any newsworthy attention in 1969 and during the
subsequent years that passed. There are very few archived news releases
about this incident which has practically become a forgotten occurrence.

The only detailed information I have been able to locate to date regarding
any U.S. Military investigative documentation on the disappearance of the
U.S. Navy C-47 is available at the Webpage for the U.S. Navy Judge Advocate
General’s Corps, JAG Manual Investigations:

http://www.jag.navy.mil/library/jagman_investigations.htm

Once at this webpage you can access the rather lengthy investigative
documentation by clicking on “Download” for the following description:

1969 04 AUG MISSING AIRCRAFT BUNO 17254 Download

According to the investigative report, the U.S. Navy aircraft was on a
scheduled maintenance flight to Buenos Aires, Argentina and on board were 16
passengers comprised of U.S. Navy and U.S. Air Force service members along
with several spouses.

Radio contact with the U.S. Navy aircraft was lost after the aircraft was
approximately 27 miles south of the capital city of Santiago—-some 20
minutes after departure—- somewhere between Rancagua, Chile and Angostura,
Chile according to the report findings.

The flight path appears initially to have been one that flew along the
Chilean side of the Andes mountain range until it was to reach a more
southern point at Curico, Chile and then take a flight path East through an
approved mountain pass through the Andes mountains towards Buenos Aires.

The lost radio contact happened at least 15 minutes before the aircraft was
even scheduled to reach the southern beacon point at Curico, Chile to access
the southern mountain pass.

The August timeframe is during the winter season in Chile and Argentina
—essentially the reverse of our seasons here in the U.S.— and the
weather conditions were apparently very poor. Although a somewhat intensive
search was conducted at the time by Chilean military and civilian personnel
along with some American military aircraft support, severe weather was a
factor and the search ended on August 14, 1969. References were made to
continuing the search later during their warmer season but I have not been
able to confirm that this ever really took place.

This unresolved and mysterious tragedy was overshadowed and subsequently
forgotten due in part to the extreme weather conditions at the time and
quite possibly because on July 24, 1969 the Apollo 11 Astronauts had just
returned from the first successful moon landing.

Realistically, I understand that the chances are remote that any evidence of
wreckage will ever be located, but then again, technology has advanced since
then, and there is always a chance that a renewed search might turn up
something. Surely, high resolution satellite imagery and digital analysis
could play a big part in discovering the wreckage of the aircraft. In order
for there to be any attention given to this unsolved tragedy, it needs to be
brought to the attention of our government, the Chilean government and
anyone else that might have expertise in finding and recovering lost and
missing aircraft.

My hope is that this lost aircraft mystery will spur interest in the public
and government sector to begin a renewed effort to help locate the
wreckage.

I believe what prompted me to finally express this request is my having come
across a blog site addressing aircraft crashes at:

http://www.pacaeropress.websitetoolbox.com/post?id=3656538

On this Blog site there are posts from at least two individuals whose
parents were passengers on the ill-fated aircraft. They are still hoping
that the wreckage site will be found one day.

Siezetheidea
Georgia (USA)
Read more:https://tighar.org/smf/index.php?topic=628.0

 

Accident description: DOUGLAS C-47M
Last updated: 19 August 2018
Status:
Date: Monday 4 August 1969
Type: Silhouette image of generic DC3 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Douglas C-47M (DC-3)
Operator: United States Navy
Registration: 17254
C/n / msn: 25629/14184
First flight: 1944
Crew: Fatalities: 4 / Occupants: 4
Passengers: Fatalities: 12 / Occupants: 12
Total: Fatalities: 16 / Occupants: 16
Aircraft damage: Damaged beyond repair
Location: Andes Mountains (   Chile)
Phase: En route (ENR)
Nature: Military
Departure airport: Santiago-Los Cerrillos Airport (ULC/SCTI), Chile
Destination airport: Buenos Aires (unknown airport), BA, Argentina

Narrative:
The airplane operated on a flight from El Belloto Naval Air Station near Vina del Mar, Chile, to Buenos Aires, Argentina. One intermediate stop had been made at Los Cerrillos Airport, Santiago, Chile, for international clearance.
Last radio contact was at 17:16.

Sources:

» C-47 BuNo 17254 Missing Aircraft and Sixteen Andes Mountains 1969

The Disappearance of US Navy Plane 17254 – Chile, 1969 [ Part Two – The Search ]

In this article, I will detail the original search efforts and eyewitness accounts from the official US Navy report on the incident.

Although many details of this fateful day have only recently become clear to me, the story is something I have been aware of since childhood. It was my uncle on my mother’s side, LCDR James Peter Kuhn, who was co-pilot on this flight.


It is my intention to bring some closure to this nearly 49-year-old mystery, and to that end, I am assembling a team whose objective is to locate the missing aircraft and prompt the repatriation of those 16 souls who are still lost to us.

Our current focus is a thorough analysis of all known reports, as well as the acquisition and analysis of all relevant spatial data and environmental conditions for the area in question.

  • Heading up research and analysis – Catalyst, aka – @gra – A geologist by training, cartographer and GIS analyst by occupation, and an explorer by nature.
  • Expeditionary team resources – @wolfcat – global explorer.

In February of 2019, we will make an expedition into the Andes Mountains and attempt to locate the missing aircraft and those who were onboard.


In Part One of our exploration into the fate of Navy Plane 17254… I presented a timeline of events beginning with fueling up the plane at 1100 (11 am) at El Belloto Airfield, to the final transmission at 1715 (5:15 pm), after having departed from Los Cerrillos Airfield in Santiago just 25 minutes prior.

 

Read More: https://steemit.com/history/@lovejoy/the-disappearance-of-us-navy-plane-17254-chile-1969-part-two-the-search

C-124 Globemaster Missing November 22, 1952 FOUND 6/9/2012

Colony Glacier: A Race Against Time

Colony Glacier, AK – Operation Colony Glacier is underway, an annual mission conducted with joint forces to find and remove remnants and debris from a military plane crash 66 years ago. The plane and its occupants were thought to have vanished until 2012, when pieces were spotted from the window of a National Guard aircraft.

The air is crisp and the ride is shaky, but the determination on Captain Victoria Martinez’s face, is unwavering.

Captain Martinez is the first woman to be level 2 mountaineer certified – a challenge she took all to help reunite families with their loved ones lost over 60 years ago.

Now, she spends her June crawling on hands and knees, finding remnants of a C-124 that crashed into Mount Gannet in 1952.

Read more: http://www.youralaskalink.com/news/colony-glacier-a-race-against-time/article_769257a0-7441-11e8-8831-fbe08459bd04.html

 

 

DFN:Colony Glacier Crash Recovery Story, ANCHORAGE, AK, UNITED STATES, 06.16.2018

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The 1952 Mount Gannett C-124 crash was an accident in which a United States Air Force Douglas C-124 Globemaster II military transport aircraft crashed into Mount Gannett in the Chugach Mountains, Alaska, on November 22, 1952. All of the 52 people on board were killed.

The C-124 departed McChord Air Base in Washington state en route to Elmendorf Air Force Base near Anchorage, Alaska, with a crew of 11 and 41 Army and Air Force passengers. The flight was recorded as passing Middleton Island in the Gulf of Alaska. Around 4pm, a distress call was received by the pilot of a Northwest Orient Airlines passenger aircraft. The reception was very poor, but the Northwest captain made out the sentence: “As long as we have to land, we might as well land here.”Weather near Elmendorf at the time was very bad with heavy clouds. The C-124 was flying without visual references, using just altitude, a radio beacon and a stopwatch. There was no further communication from the C-124 and it failed to arrive at Elmendorf as scheduled.

The severe weather continued for three days, so searching was only able to begin on November 25. Thirty-two military aircraft searched the surrounding mountains and four Coast Guard vessels searched Prince William Sound. The wreckage of the plane was found on November 28, 1952, on the south side of Mount Gannett by Terris Moore from the Fairbanks Civil Air Patrol and Lieutenant Thomas Sullivan from the 10th Air Rescue Squadron. The pair spotted the tail section of the C-124 sticking out of the snow at about 8,100 feet close to the summit of Mount Gannett. Sullivan and Moore recorded the location as being on the Surprise Glacier, which flows south and empties into Harriman Fjord. However, the 2012 rediscovery of the remains of the aircraft at the foot of Colony Glacier, where it enters Lake George, suggests that the actual crash location was a little further north on the Mount Gannett ice field, sufficient for the debris to be carried 12 miles (19 km) down the north-flowing Colony Glacier over the subsequent 60 years.

Moore, who was a mountaineer and pilot as well as president of the University of Alaska, told journalists the C-124 “obviously was flying at full speed” and appeared to have slid down the cliffs of Mount Gannett and exploded. Wreckage was spread across several acres of the glacier. Moore surmised that the pilot had narrowly missed other Chugach Range peaks during his approach. “From this I conclude he was on instrument, flying blind, and probably crashed without any warning whatsoever to him directly into the southerly face of Mt. Gannett.”

Moore reported finding blood on a blanket and noted the “sickly-sweet smell of death” at the site. It seemed clear that there were no survivors. Sullivan noted that recovery of remains would be very difficult as the glacier was already covered by fresh snow eight feet deep. Near the remains of the aircraft, drifted snow was piled up to hundreds of feet. Apparently, the crash had also triggered avalanches that had further buried the remains. Because of the difficult conditions, the recovery effort was terminated after a week and the victims’ families were told they would have no remains to bury. The debris was then covered by snow and ice, and was lost for the next 60 years.

At the time, this was only the second fatal accident for the C-124, and was by far the worst. However, the following year saw even more deadly crashes at Moses Lake, Washington, and Tachikawa, Japan, Overall, this was the fourth-worst accident involving a Douglas C-124.

Read more: (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1952_Mount_Gannett_C-124_crash)

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Military IDs remains of 17 service members killed in 1952 plane crash near Colony Glacier

Recent news that the remains of some of the service members who perished in a 1952 military plane crash in Southcentral Alaska had been identified brought closure to some family members of the deceased, while others struggled with the bittersweet realization that their lost family members would not yet be brought home.

Brian Gorman, whose uncle Col. Eugene Smith was among the 17 service members identified Wednesday, said his family is excited to bring closure to the old story about “Uncle Gene.”

“We’re bringing him home,” Gorman said from Delaware on Wednesday.

His uncle died in the crash on Nov. 22, 1952, when a C-124 Globemaster — a massive cargo and crew transport plane — en route to Elmendorf Air Force Base from Washington state crashed into Mount Gannett above Colony Glacier during bad weather.

All 52 people aboard perished in the crash. The wreckage was discovered six days later, on Nov. 28, 1952, but was eventually lost in the grumbling movement of the Colony Glacier, about 50 miles east of Anchorage.

Bittersweet’

Tonja Anderson’s grandfather, Isaac Anderson, was also killed in the crash. Her grandfather’s remains were not among those identified on Wednesday.

She said from Florida that the news was “bittersweet” and “overwhelming.”

Anderson has worked tirelessly to bring families of the crash together and is the administrator of a Facebook page dedicated to families of those who died in the crash. Since the plane was discovered in 2012, she has continued to push JPAC to search for the missing service members on the glacier.

This summer, Anderson will be attending the funeral services of several of the families with whom she has built relationships over the past few years.

“I will continue to reach out … and push the government to go back and still go searching,” she said.

Read More: https://www.adn.com/alaska-news/article/military-ids-remains-17-service-members-killed-1952-plane-crash-near-colony-glacier/2014/06/19/

 

 

Fifty-Two US Troops Who Crashed On This Glacier 60 Years Ago Have Finally Been Found

 

Thanksgiving was just five days away on November 22, 1952 when a huge Air Force plane nicknamed “Old Shaky” went down East of Anchorage, AK killing all 52 servicemembers on board.

The U.S. was in the thick of the Korean War at the time and the plane was filled with troops from the Air Force, Army, the Navy, and Marines — all of whom were likely eager to enjoy the holiday with family and friends.

As they flew above the Chugach Mountains, only minutes away from landing at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, the massive C-124 Globemaster suffered a malfunction and began losing altitude.

The reason even this is known, explains Casey Grove and Mike Dunham at Stars & Stripes, is because a nearby Northwest pilot deciphered a scratchy radio signal over his headset that said, “As long as we have to land, we might as well land here.”

Read More: https://www.businessinsider.com/c-124-crash-november-22-1952-found-in-alaska-2012-6

 

Uncovering the losses in a 1952 C-124 crash

JOINT BASE ELMENDORF-RICHARDSON, Alaska — Donald Jurewicz, Joint Task Force-Alaska deputy director for operations, explains details of the C-124 crash site to Tonja Anderson during her visit here Sept. 28, 2012. Anderson was in Alaska to learn about the 1952 crash that claimed the life of her grandfather and 51 other passengers. The aircraft wreckage was recently discovered on Colony Glacier, 14 miles south of the original crash site on Mt. Gannett. During her visit, Anderson was able to view items recovered from the site. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Mikal Canfield)

 

Almost 50 years after her husband’s death in a military transport plane crash in the mountains of Alaska, Dorothy Anderson was finally ready to accept his flag.

The C-124 Globemaster disappeared under an avalanche of rock and snow after flying into a mountain during a winter storm on Nov. 22, 1952. During the numb months that followed, Anderson never gave up hope that her 22-year-old husband survived the accident — even though there was no tangible evidence otherwise. None of the bodies of the 52 service members on board were recovered.

For decades, the plane and the men it carried seemed all but forgotten by everyone except by those whose lives, like Airman Basic Isaac Anderson’s widow, had been irrevocably changed by the tragedy in the midst of the Korean War.

When Dorothy Anderson’s grown granddaughter asked in late 1999 if she might try to obtain her grandfather’s ceremonial burial flag, the aging widow, who never remarried, said yes.

Tonja Anderson-Dell had grown up hearing only fragments of her grandfather’s story. For years, her grandmother had shut down when Tonja asked about him. Tonja’s own father, Isaac Jr., was just 1½ years old when he lost his airman dad.

Finally having her grandmother’s blessing, Tonja wasted no time in her quest to obtain the flag — and as much information as she could about the crash that claimed the grandfather she never met.

She couldn’t have imagined that the ill-fated Globemaster would show itself in a shifting Alaska glacier in 2012, a dozen years after she set out on her search — or that she would form links with some of the families of the 17 whose remains finally made it home in June.

‘Instant death’

Isaac Anderson, a native of Tampa, Florida, joined the Air Force at the outset of the Korean War as a way to support his family. He was a senior vehicle operator assigned to the 625th Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron at Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska, when he came home on leave in October 1952.

 

Read more: https://www.militarytimes.com/2014/07/10/uncovering-the-losses-in-a-1952-c-124-crash/

 

 

Found: Bodies of 17 military members lost in 1952 crash

 

Found: Bodies of 17 military members lost in 1952 crash

The bodies of 17 service members lost in a plane crash in Alaska more than 60 years ago have been recovered and identified, the Defense Department announced.

Fifty-two people — all members of the military — were on board the Douglas C-124 Globemaster when it crashed while flying from McChord Air Force Base in Washington to Elmendorf Air Force Base in Alaska on Nov. 22, 1952, the department said in a statement.

At least two of them had Southern California ties, the Los Angeles Times reported in the days after the crash. Both were dentists: Air Force Col. Noel E. Hoblit, 45, whose parents lived in Pasadena, and Army Lt. Col. Lawrence S. Singleton, “about 49,” of North Hollywood. Hoblit was the officer in charge of all dental work in the Air Force’s Alaskan Command, The Times said.

Because of weather, recovery efforts could not start immediately after the crash, and search parties couldn’t find any of the victims in late November and early December of that year, the Defense Department said.

The crash site was finally spotted in June 2012 by an Alaska National Guard helicopter crew doing a training mission over the Colony Glacier, and the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command and Joint Task Force team started a recovery operation, the Defense Department said.

The Globemaster plane “literally just flew into the side of the mountain,” Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson historian Douglas Beckstead said in 2012. “It looks as though there was an avalanche of both snow and rock that came down and buried the debris.”

“It’s taken 60 years for the wreckage and portions of the plane to actually come out of the glacier underneath all that ice and snow,” Gregory Berg, a forensic anthropologist for the military, said in 2012. “It’s starting to erode out now.” Berg emphasized that what with DNA analysis, dental comparisons and skeletal analysis, the identification process could take years.

read more: http://www.latimes.com/nation/nationnow/la-na-nn-1952-plane-crash-alaska-20140618-story.html#

Airman who died in 1952 Alaska crash brought home for burial

Mike Smith holds an old photograph of his brother, Army Col. Gene Smith, outside his Wilmington home last summer after the rediscovery of the wreckage of the Air Force plane his brother was killed aboard when it crashed in Alaska in 1952. News Journal file Mike Smith, 89, holds a photo of his brother outside of his Wilmington home. EMILY VARISCO/ SPECIAL TO THE NEWS JOURNAL 08/01/12 - Relatives - Mike Smith, 89, holds an old photograph of his brother outside of his Wilmington home Wednesday, August 1, 2012. Smith is the brother of Colonel Eugene Smith who was on board an Air Force flight when it crashed in Alaska in 1952. EMILY VARISCO/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS JOURNAL

A day would rarely go by when 90-year-old Michael Smith wouldn’t ask his Internet savvy young relatives about the big brother he idolized all his life.

They would dutifully print out any Google Alert that included the word “Globemaster” and “Alaska” or any other clue about what had become of Col. Gene Smith and 51 fellow servicemen killed in the Nov. 22, 1952, U.S. Air Force C-124 Globemaster crash into Mount Gannett. But answers – and Gene Smith’s return to Wilmington, Del., for Friday’s funeral at St. Elizabeth Catholic Church — came too late for Michael Smith, who died two years before it was learned that his brother’s remains were recovered.

“It hurts,” Jim Coen, Michael Smith’s nephew, said. “He loved his big brother; admired him his whole life.”

Gene Smith and the others were lost when the plane, likely travelling at full speed in a snowstorm, slammed into the 10,000-foot mountain and fell in pieces into the Colony Glacier, about 50 miles east of Anchorage.

Gene was 39, unmarried and a military lifer. His move up the ranks was a source of pride for his Irish-immigrant family. They were told he was flying from McChord Air Force Base in Washington state to Elmendorf Air Force Base, where he was in line to be named base commander.

read more: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2014/07/25/remains-air-force-serviceman-lost-on-alaskan-glacier-crash-returns-home.html

 Douglas C-54 Skymaster missing January 26, 1950 “Operation Mike”

Squadron Activity Report, Maxwell Airforce Base, March 1946.jpg

 

Crew: 1Lt Kyle E. McMichael (Instructor Pilot/Mission Commander), 1Lt Mike Tisik (Pilot), Maj Gerald F. Brittain (Copilot), 1Lt Joseph W. Metzler (Navigator), SSgt Clarence A. Gibson (Radio Operator), MSgt Clyde A. Streitman (Flight Engineer), TSgt Harry W. McConegley (Flight Engineer), SSgt Raymond H. Snow (Flight Engineer)

 Passengers: TSgt Jack P. Faris, SSgt Robert Ahearn, SSgt Burnis T. Lively, SSgt Raymond G. Mangold, SSgt John J. McDonald, SSgt Clinton D. Tompkins, Sgt Ray L. Asel, Sgt Donald W. Dagl, Sgt Noel B. Jones, Sgt Roy F. Jones, Sgt Junior Lee Moore, Sgt Harold R. Noell, Sgt Tommy E. Rhoads, Sgt Julian C. Thomas, Cpl Albie P. Baughman, Cpl Jeff D. Johnson, Cpl Henry S. Kerehner, Cpl Raymond H. Motheny, Cpl Bernard (NMI) Portrey, Cpl Richard L. Suggs, Cpl Thomas J. Young, Pfc John A. Chalopka, Pfc Charles W. Cook, Pfc Billie C. Cummins, Pfc Francis D. Hofer, Pfc Herman L. Lawson, Pfc Loyd E. Lowry, Pfc Wilham W. Cranor, Pvt Robert M. Hiatt, Pvt Blake F. Maxwell, Pvt Robert J. Reitmeyer, Capt Frank E. Gregory, SSgt Jack E. Dickerson, Mr. Eldon V. Dolansky, Mrs. Joyce M. Espe, Victor E. Espe (infant)

On 26 January 1950, the Douglas C-54 Skymaster S/N 42-72469 disappeared going from Alaska to Montana, with 44 people aboard. The aircraft made its last radio contact two hours into its eight-hour flight. Despite one of the largest rescue efforts carried out by the US military, no trace of the aircraft has ever been found. It is considered one of the largest groups of American military personnel to ever go missing.

An hour after it failed to arrive in Montana, “Operation Mike”, named for aircraft commander First Lt. Kyle L. McMichael,[3] was launched, a search and rescue program combining as many as 85 American and Canadian planes, in addition to 7,000 personnel, searching 350,000 square miles of the Pacific Northwest.[4] The search was aided by the fact soldiers and equipment had already been ferried north for the upcoming Exercise Sweetbriar, a joint Canada-US war games scenario.[6] Continuance of the operation confounded searchers, giving many false positive reports of smoke signals, garbled communications and sightings of “survivors”.

On 30 January, a C-47, Air Force serial number 45-1015 from the 57th Fighter Wing, that had been participating in the search, stalled and crashed in the McClintoc mountains near Whitehorse. Its crew members were injured, but there were no fatalities. The pilot walked 13 km to the Alaska Highway and flagged down a truck to call in support for his 5–8 crewmates.[3][5][7]

On 2 February it was reported that two planes and two radio stations in the Yukon area had heard unintelligible radio signals but attempts to “fix” the position were fruitless. Likewise, an isolated settler had reported seeing a large plane over his cabin at Beaver Lake in interior of British Columbia located 500 miles south of the Yukon boundary-250 miles north of Vancouver and 200 miles west of the Alaska Highway air route.[8]

On 7 February, a C-47D, 45-1037, from Eielson Air Force Base employed on the search by the 5010th Wing, crashed on a mountain slope south of Aisihik Lake. There were ten crew on board, but there were no fatalities.[9] On 16 February, a Royal Canadian Air Force C-47KJ-936, crashed near Snag. Again, its four crew members sustained only light injuries.[10] Later its wreckage would be temporarily mistaken for the missing C-54.[11]

The operation was indefinitely suspended on 14 February, as the search planes were needed to investigate the crash of a B-36 that had been carrying, and had dropped, a Fat Man type nuclear weapon, though the core of the weapon in this case was lead.[4]

Read more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1950_Douglas_C-54D_disappearance

 

https://www.facebook.com/OperationMike/

 

 

The Loss of the Douglas C-54-D in 1950

 

1950 Douglas Transport

Scores of planes have permanently gone missing since the beginnings of aviation a century ago, but almost all of these have one thing in common. They were flying over deep water or they were close to deep water when they disappeared from the radar. It makes sense: it is very difficult for a large plane to come down on land, even in the wilderness and not be found by determined searchers. This is what makes the disappearance of the Douglas C-54-D in 1950 so mysterious.

The Douglas in question was flying, 26 Jan, from Alaska to Texas (via Montana) with forty-four souls on board. The plane could have crossed into the Pacific with bad weather, but its last signal to the ground came at 15.09 when the pilot  reported that it was flying over Snag, a village in the Yukon (Canada) a long way inland. The search and rescue mission that came afterwards operated in the Yukon or the badlands of northern British Columbia.

The Douglas C-54 was the classic American military transport of that period. It was almost one hundred feet long and over seventeen metric tonnes. This was not a tiny plane like the L’Oiseau Blanc lost in 1927, made, in large part, of canvas and plywood. If you came upon the C-54’s grave today or, for that matter, in a thousand years the chances are that you would notice.

And this brings us back to the question of how a plane of this size can go missing.  The US military got as many as eighty-five planes – American and Canadian – in the air for Operation Mike, the search and followed up information from witnesses on the ground. But nothing came of these. 20 February, three and a half weeks later, the search was abandoned. It had taken place in horrendous weather conditions and two planes had been wrecked in the search.

To be fair to the US military Operation Mike was carried out over some of the wildest lands in the continent. If a plane comes down in a desert it can be spotted, but in the forests of the Pacific North-west a seventeen tonne plane can play at needle in a pine haystack. Still sixty years have passed… Is it perhaps, as some have suggested, in a lake. The pilot may have landed the plane on an iced over body of water and whoever survived then died in the cold that followed. The plane would have disappeared into the water once spring came.

If you lose a family member in a plane somewhere over the Pacific there is a part of you that can pretend that they might have made it to an island where they are presently raising children with a beautiful Italian air hostess. There is no such consolation for the family members of the C-54.

 

Read more: http://www.strangehistory.net/2013/01/11/the-loss-of-the-douglas-c-54-d-in-1950/

 

1950 Douglas C-54D disappearance

Squadron Activity Report, Maxwell Airforce Base, March 1946.jpg

On 26 January 1950, the Douglas C-54 Skymaster serial number 42-72469 disappeared en route from Alaska to Montana, with 44 people aboard.[1][2] The aircraft made its last radio contact two hours into its eight-hour flight. Despite one of the largest rescue efforts carried out by the US military, no trace of the aircraft has ever been found.[2] It is considered one of the largest groups of American military personnel to ever go missing.[3]

Flight

The aircraft was part of the First Strategic Support Squadron, Strategic Air Command. out of Biggs AFB, Texas. In addition to its eight-man crew, it was carrying 36 passengers, including two civilians: a woman and her infant son.[4] An earlier attempt to depart had been made, but due to trouble with one of its four engines, it was delayed several hours.[5] The flight was from Anchorage, Alaska to Great Falls, Montana; two hours after its eventual departure it reported it was on-course and had just passed over Snag, Yukon – but there were no further messages.

Read More: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1950_Douglas_C-54D_disappearance

 

 

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Douglas C-54D Disappearance

Douglas C-54D Disappearance

 

Date: January 26, 1950

Location: Anchorage, AK

Flying, from Alaska to Texas, via Montana, with 44 souls on board, 8 crew members, and 36 passengers, including two civilians: a woman and her infant son. The aircraft, Douglas C-54 Skymaster serial number 42-72469, made its last radio contact two hours into its 8 hour flight, when the pilot reported that it was flying over Snag, a village in the Yukon of Canada, a long way inland. Despite one of the largest rescue efforts carried out by the US military, no trace of the aircraft has ever been found. It is considered one of the largest groups of American military personnel to ever go missing.The aircraft was part of the First Strategic Support Squadron, Strategic Air Command. out of Biggs AFB, TX.

It had made an initial attempt to depart, but was delayed several hours after reporting trouble with one of its four engines. The aircraft was flying from Anchorage, Alaska to Great Falls, Montana; 2 hours after its eventual departure it reported it was on course and had just passed over Snag, Yukon. There were no further messages.

An hour after it failed to show up in Montana, Operation Mike, named for aircraft commander First Lt. Kyle L. McMichael, was launched, a search and rescue program combining as many as 85 American and Canadian planes, in addition to 7,000 personnel, searching 350,000 square miles of the Pacific Northwest. The search was aided by the fact soldiers and equipment had already been ferried north for the upcoming Exercise Sweetbriar, a joint Canada/US war games scenario. However continuance of the operation also confounded searchers, giving many false positive reports of smoke signals, garbled communications and sightings of survivors.

On January 30, a C-47, Air Force serial number 45-1015, from the 57th Fighter Wing that had been participating in the search, stalled and crashed in the McClintoc mountains, its crew members were injured, but there were no fatalities. Its pilot walked 8 miles to the Alaska Highway and flagged down a truck to call in support for his 5-8 crewmates. On February 7, a C-47D, 45-1037, from Eielson Air Force Base employed on the search by the 5010th Wing, crashed on a mountain slope south of Aisihik Lake. There were 10 crew on board however there were no fatalities. On February 16, a Royal Canadian Air Force C-47, KJ-936, crashed near Snag. Again, its four crew members sustained only light injuries. Later its wreckage would be temporarily mistaken for the missing C-54.

The operation was indefinitely suspended on February 14, as the search planes were needed to investigate the crash of a B-36 that had been carrying, and had dropped its Fat Man type nuclear weapon, though the core of the weapon was lead in this case.

On February 20, the search was officially cancelled and notifications were sent to next of kin informing them that the passengers were presumed dead.

To read more: http://thenightsky.org/skymaster.html

Lake Huron (Lockheed F-94C)

 

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the evening of March 16, 1957, Lockheed F-94C 50-1059 assigned to the 46th Fighter Interceptor Squadron disappeared without a trace.  The F-94C Starfire was piloted by twenty-seven year old 1st. Lt. Henry Charles Nicolay, and radar intercept officer 1st Lt. Harold A. Lewis. The crew of the Starfire was part of a four ship flight en route from Bunker Hill A.F.B., Indiana to Wurtsmith A.F.B. located in Losco County, Michigan. As the flight approached their destination 1st. Lt. Nicolay’s F-94C dropped out the formation and failed to respond to radio messages from the flight leader. Clouds and darkness are thought to be factors in the loss of the F-94C and its crew, who are presumed to have crashed into Lake Huron. 1st Lt. Nicolay was married, with two young sons aged one and1/2 and six months respectively. 1st Lt. Harold A. Lewis was married and they had one son

 

Posted on http://aircraftwrecks.com/

 

I look forward to the day I can give their sons a call stating we have found you fathers’s plane. ~Tonja